Belgian Chocolates Cause Salmonella Outbreak In 11 Countries: WHO Warns

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Belgian Chocolates Cause Salmonella Outbreak In 11 Countries: WHO Warns

The recent days have seen a rise in Salmonella cases in countries like the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, and Germany, a stomach condition that is caused by an infection.

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World Health Organisation (WHO) issued a warning recently regarding a salmonella outbreak across 11 countries. Their investigations suggest that the primary cause behind it is Belgian chocolate, which is popularly consumed globally. Countries like the United Kingdom, Germany, France, and Belgium have witnessed a spike in infections that have raised alarms.

Popular brands like Kinder are under the radar regarding food security regulations. In Belgium, a Kinder chocolate factory has been shut down due to its links with the rising Salmonella cases. The country's food security authority did not receive adequate information during the investigation, because of which they were ordered to stop their production.

Kinder Products Recalled In Countries

Belgium has ordered Ferrero to reopen their factories only when the necessary information is provided, guaranteeing that food security norms are followed. "Such a decision is never taken lightly, but the current circumstances make it necessary. The food security of our citizens can never be neglected," the country's agriculture minister, David Clarinval, told the BBC. Further, the government has implored its citizens not to consume the product and instructed many outlets to remove them from their shelves.

The recent developments have raised severe alarms globally. The United States recalled all the Kinder chocolates from the shops. In the United Kingdom, the Food Standard Agency asked people not to consume them, despite their best before date. "We have emphasised to the authorities in Belgium the importance of taking a precautionary approach. We trust that they will continue to put consumers' needs first in any action they take," Tina Potter, the head of incidents at the Food Standard Agency, told the news publication. Countries in Asia such as Hong Kong and Singapore have done the needful.

What Is Salmonella Infection?

Also known as 'Salmonellosis', Salmonella Infection is defined by Mayo Clinic as a 'common bacterial disease that affects the intestinal tract'. The bacteria are shed through faeces as it lives in either animal or human intestines and is contracted by consuming contaminated food and beverages. The infections can be caused by raw or undercooked meat, poultry or eggs.

Some of the common symptoms include diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, Fever, headache, blood in the stool and abdominal cramps. Most of them last from two to seven days, with diarrhoea as an exception for up to 10 days. Salmonella poisoning occurs 12-72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria. While it is not a fatal condition, it can leave young children and the elderly vulnerable.

Also Read: Food Wrapped In Newspapers Causes Slow Poisoning When Consumed, Know About It

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